Track Categories

The track category is the heading under which your abstract will be reviewed and later published in the conference printed matters if accepted. During the submission process, you will be asked to select one track category for your abstract.

Pain Management can be simple or complex, depending on the cause of the pain. An example of pain that is typically less complex would be nerve root irritation from a herniated disc with pain radiating down the leg. This condition can often be alleviated with an epidural steroid injection and physical therapy. Sometimes, however, the pain does not go away. This can require a wide variety of skills and techniques to treat the pain. There are many sources of pain. One way of dividing these sources of pain is to divide them into two groups, nociceptive pain and neuropathic pain. How pain is treated depends in large part upon what type of pain it is. Nociceptive pain: Examples of nociceptive pain are a cut or a broken bone. Tissue damage or injury initiates signals that are transferred through peripheral nerves to the brain via the spinal cord. Pain signals are modulated throughout the pathways. This is how we become aware that something is hurting. Neuropathic pain: Neuropathic pain is pain caused by damage or disease that affects the nervous system. Sometimes there is no obvious source of pain, and this pain can occur spontaneously. Classic examples of this pain are shingles and diabetic peripheral neuropathy. It is pain that can occur after nerves are cut or after a stroke. Most back, leg, and arm pain is nociceptive pain. Nociceptive pain can be divided into two parts, radicular or somatic. Radicular pain: Radicular pain is pain that stems from irritation of the nerve roots, for example, from a disc herniation. It goes down the leg or arm in the distribution of the nerve that exits from the nerve root at the spinal cord. Associated with radicular pain is radiculopathy, which is weakness, numbness, tingling or loss of reflexes in the distribution of the nerve. Somatic pain: Somatic pain is pain limited to the back or thighs. The problem that doctors and patients face with back pain, is that after a patient goes to the doctor and has an appropriate history taken, a physical exam performed, and appropriate imaging studies (for example, X-rays, MRIs or CT scans), the doctor can only make an exact diagnosis a minority of the time. The cause of most back pain is not identified and is classifies as idiopathic. Three structures in the back which frequently cause back pain are the facet joints, the discs, and the sacroiliac joint. The facet joints are small joints in the back of the spine that provide stability and limit how far you can bend back or twist. The discs are the "shock absorbers" that are located between each of the bony building blocks (vertebrae) of the spine. The sacroiliac joint is a joint at the buttock area that serves in normal walking and helps to transfer weight from the upper body onto the legs.

 

  • Track 1-1Interventional Procedures
  • Track 1-2Medication Management
  • Track 1-3Physical Therapy or Chiropractic Therapy
  • Track 1-4Psychological Counseling and Support
  • Track 1-5Acupuncture and other Alternative Therapies
  • Track 1-6Referral to other Medical Specialists
  • Track 1-7Etiology of Various Types of Pain

Epidemiology is the study and analysis of the patterns, causes, and effects of health and disease conditions in defined populations. It is the cornerstone of public health, and shapes policy decisions and evidence-based practice by identifying risk factors for disease and targets for preventive healthcare. Epidemiologists help with study design, collection, and statistical analysis of data, amend interpretation and dissemination of results (including peer review and occasional systematic review). Epidemiology has helped develop methodology used in clinical research, public health studies, and, to a lesser extent, basic research in the biological sciences. Major areas of epidemiological study include disease causation, transmission, outbreak investigation, disease surveillance, forensic epidemiology and screening, biomonitoring, and comparisons of treatment effects such as in clinical trialsEpidemiologists rely on other scientific disciplines like biology to better understand disease processes, statistics to make efficient use of the data and draw appropriate conclusions, social sciences to better understand proximate and distal causes, and engineering for exposure assessment.

 

  • Track 2-1Classification of Pain
  • Track 2-2Anatomical Causes of Back Pain
  • Track 2-3Current Trends in Long Term Back Pain Management
  • Track 2-4The Importance of Pain Phenotyping Lessons from Headache
  • Track 2-5Facial Pain & Peripheral Nerve Pain
  • Track 2-6Coccydynia & Compression Fractures
  • Track 2-7Post-Herpetic Neuralgia
  • Track 2-8Myofasciitis & Torticollis
  • Track 2-9Piriformis syndrome & Plantar Fasciitis
  • Track 2-10Lateral Epicondylitis
  • Track 2-11Cancer Pain & Treatments

Emergency physicians play an important role in early diagnosis and prompt management of the conditions. Experienced emergency physicians can detect important clinical findings and give a provisional diagnosis to a patient before transferring her to general surgery or obstetrics and gynecology departments according to their judgment. Previous studies showed that some clinical indicators were helpful to distinguish appendicitis and common obstetrics and gynecological conditions (OB-GYNc) from nonspecific abdominal pain. To resolve the difficulty in diagnosis of acute lower abdominal pain in female patients, whose appendicitis is confounded by OB-GYNc, imaging studies had been done. Imaging investigations such as ultrasonography, computerized tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have high accuracies in diagnosis of acute lower abdominal pain. However, the universal usage of CT may not be cost-effective in countries with limited healthcare resources. In addition, time spent for such investigations is also important for the emergency department. Clinical diagnostic scoring, on the other hand, may be more appropriate for early diagnosis in an emergency department setting. Clinical scoring for diagnosis of appendicitis was studied for its application as a guideline used for admission and investigations. However, such clinical scoring system was not designed for diagnosis of acute lower abdominal pain from obstetrics and gynecology conditions (OB-GYNc), which are also important in young adult females. Precise and systematic pain assessment is required to make the correct diagnosis and determine the most efficacious treatment plan for patients presenting with pain.

 

  • Track 3-1Diagnosis of Neuropathic Pain
  • Track 3-2Neuropathic Pain Scoring Systems
  • Track 3-3Neurophysiology-New Insights on Pain Mechanisms
  • Track 3-4The Role of Genetics in Pain Processing
  • Track 3-5Functional Neuroanatomy of Spinal Pain Pathways
  • Track 3-6Imaging of Spinal Pain & other Pains
  • Track 3-7Past, Present, and Future of Neuromodulation
  • Track 3-8Interrupting Pain Pathways- rationale for electrical stimulation
  • Track 3-9The Role of Neurosurgery in the Management of Axial and Upper Limb Radiculitis

The various neuropathic pains can be difficult to treat. However, with careful diagnosis and often a combination of methods of treatments, there is an excellent chance of improving the pain and return of function. Medications are a mainstay of treatment of neuropathic pain. In general, they work by influencing how pain information is handled by the body. Most pain information is filtered out by the central nervous system, usually at the level of the spinal cord. For example, if you are sitting in a chair, your peripheral nerves send the response to the pressure between your body and the chair to your nervous system. However, because that information serves no usual purpose, it is filtered out in the spinal cord. Many medications to treat neuropathic pain operate on this filtering process. The types of medications used for neuropathic pain include antidepressants, which influence the amount of serotonin or norepinephrine, and antiseizure medications, which act on various neurotransmitters, such as GABA and glycine. One of the most powerful tools in treating neuropathic pain is the spinal cord stimulator, which delivers tiny amounts of electrical energy directly onto the spine. Stimulation works by interrupting inappropriate pain information being sent up to the brain. It also creates a tingling in the pain extremity, which masks pain.

 

  • Track 4-1Better Research Methodologies - The Hierarchy of Trial Design
  • Track 4-2Central Mechanisms of Neuropathic Pain
  • Track 4-3Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), also called reflex sympathetic dystrophy
  • Track 4-4Fibromyalgia
  • Track 4-5About Spinal Surgery
  • Track 4-6Individualised Medicine
  • Track 4-7Interstitial cystitis
  • Track 4-8Irritable Bowel Syndrome

In the practice of medicine (especially surgery) and dentistry, anesthesia  is a temporary induced state with one or more of analgesia (relief from or prevention of pain), paralysis (muscle relaxation), amnesia (loss of memory), and unconsciousness. A patient under the effects of anesthetic drugs is referred to as being anesthetized. Anesthesia is freedom from pain. Each year, millions of people in the United States undergo some form of medical treatment requiring anesthesia. Anesthesia, in the hands of qualified professionals like Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs), is a safe and effective means of alleviating pain during nearly every type of medical procedure. Anesthesia care is not confined to surgery alone. The process also refers to activities that take place both before and after an anesthetic is given. In the majority of cases, anesthesia is administered by a CRNA. CRNAs work with your surgeon, dentist or podiatrist, and may work with an anesthesiologist (physician anesthetist). CRNAs are advanced practice registered nurses with specialized graduate-level education in anesthesiology. For more than 150 years, nurse anesthetists have been administering anesthesia in all types of surgical cases, using all anesthetic techniques and practicing in every setting in which anesthesia is administered. Anesthesia enables the painless performance of medical procedures that would cause severe or intolerable pain to an un-anesthetized patient.

 

  • Track 5-1Muscle Relaxation
  • Track 5-2euromuscular-blocking Drugs
  • Track 5-3Acute pain management
  • Track 5-4Sedation
  • Track 5-5Neuraxial Anesthesia

To prepare for any chronic pain coping technique, it is important to learn how to use focus and deep breathing to relax the body. Pain control techniques mainly involved Altered focus. This is a favorite technique for demonstrating how powerfully the mind can alter sensations in the body. Focus your attention on any specific non-painful part of the body and alter pain sensation in that part of the body. Dissociation As the name implies, this chronic pain technique involves mentally separating the painful body part from the rest of the body, or imagining the body and mind as separate, with the chronic pain distant from one’s mind. Sensory splitting, this technique involves dividing the sensation into separate parts. Mental anesthesia This involves imagining an injection of numbing anesthetic (like Novocain) into the painful area, such as imagining a numbing solution being injected into your low back. Mental analgesia Building on the mental anesthesia concept, this technique involves imagining an injection of a strong pain killer, such as morphine, into the painful area. Alternatively, you can imagine your brain producing massive amount of endorphins, the natural pain relieving substance of the body, and having them flow to the painful parts of your body.

 

  • Track 6-1Guidelines on Low Back Pain
  • Track 6-2ENS (Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation)
  • Track 6-3Mechanism and Management of Chronic Postoperative Pain
  • Track 6-4Towards a Common Pain Management Pathway
  • Track 6-5Sensory Splitting
  • Track 6-6Dissociation and Altered Focus
  • Track 6-7Light Therapy
  • Track 6-8Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
  • Track 6-9Occupational Therapy Pain Management
  • Track 6-10Overview of Mindfulness for the Clinic Patient
  • Track 6-11Pediatric Pain management
  • Track 6-12Cancer Pain Management
  • Track 6-13Laser Pain Therapy

Opioids are substances that act on opioid receptors to produce morphine-like effects. Opioids are most often used medically to relieve pain, and for their euphoric effects by people addicted to opioids.[3] Opioids include opiates, an older term that refers to such drugs derived from opium, including morphine itself. Other opioids are semi-synthetic and synthetic drugs such as hydrocodone, oxycodone and fentanyl; antagonist drugs such as naloxone and endogenous peptides such as the endorphins. The terms opiate and narcotic are sometimes encountered as synonyms for opioid. Opiate is properly limited to the natural alkaloids found in the resin of the opium poppy although some include semi-synthetic derivatives. Narcotic, derived from words meaning numbness or sleep, as an American legal term, refers to cocaine and opioids, and their source materials; it is also loosely applied to any illegal or controlled psychoactive drug. In some jurisdictions all controlled drugs are legally classified as narcotics. The term can have pejorative connotations and its use is generally discouraged where that is the case. Opioids are a type of narcotic pain medication. They can have serious side effects if you don't use them correctly. If you need to take opioids to control your pain, here are some ways to make sure you're taking them as safely as possible. Opioid drugs work by binding to opioid receptors in the brain, spinal cord, and other areas of the body. They reduce the sending of pain messages to the brain and reduce feelings of pain. Opioids are used to treat moderate to severe pain that may not respond well to other pain medications.

 

  • Track 7-1Opioid Maintenance Strategies with Buprenorphine
  • Track 7-2Managing Opioid Side Effects
  • Track 7-3Perspectives on Opioid Use
  • Track 7-4Neurobiology of Opioid Addiction
  • Track 7-5Managing the Difficult Patient- Opioids and Beyond
  • Track 7-6Opioids in Serious Medical Illness
  • Track 7-7Interventional Alternatives to Opioids in Pain Management
  • Track 7-8Opioid Clearance Concerns: Hepatic Concerns

Prostaglandins are a family of chemicals that are produced by the cells of the body and have several important functions. They promote inflammation that is necessary for healing, but also results in pain, and fever; support the blood clotting function of platelets; and protect the lining of the stomach from the damaging effects of acid. Prostaglandins are produced within the body's cells by the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX). There are two COX enzymes, COX-1 and COX-2. Both enzymes produce prostaglandins that promote inflammation, pain, and fever. However, only COX-1 produces prostaglandins that support platelets and protect the stomach. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) block the COX enzymes and reduce prostaglandins throughout the body. As a consequence, ongoing inflammation, pain, and fever are reduced. Since the prostaglandins that protect the stomach and support platelets and blood clotting also are reduced, NSAIDs can cause ulcers in the stomach and promote bleeding. Narcotics also referred to as opioid pain relievers are used only for pain that's severe and is not helped by other forms of painkillers. When used rigorously and underneath a doctor's direct care, these medications are often effective at reducing pain. Narcotics work by binding to receptors into the brain that blocks the sensation of pain. When used rigorously and underneath a doctor's direct care, they'll be effective at reducing pain. Antidepressant medication for treatment of depression as well as other different disorders that will occur alone or together with depression, like chronic pain, sleep disorders, or anxiety disorders. Antidepressants are medication used for the treatment of major depressive disorder and different conditions, chronic pain and neuropathic pain. Anticonvulsants, or anti-seizure medications, work as adjuvant analgesics. In different words, they can treat some forms of chronic pain even if they're not designed for that purpose. whereas the most use of anti-seizure medication is preventing seizures, anticonvulsants do seem to be effective at treating certain forms of chronic pain. These include neuropathic pain, like peripheral neuropathy, and chronic headaches like migraines.

 

  • Track 8-1Corticosteroids
  • Track 8-2Antidepressants
  • Track 8-3Anticonvulsants (Anti-seizure medications)
  • Track 8-4Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs(NSAIDS)
  • Track 8-5Narcotic Pain Medications
  • Track 8-6Non-narcotic Pain Medications

Acute and chronic pain may be conceptualized as either nociceptive or neuropathic in origin. A broad description of the predominating pain pathophysiology can usually be inferred through: Patient description Physical findings Results of laboratory tests and imaging studies.There are several pharmacological interventions that may be accustomed manage pain in arthritis. However, in choosing the acceptable approach, the practitioner must take into account to consider the efficacy. Adverse side effects, dosing frequency, patient preference, and cost in choosing medication for pain management. When a patient develops the primary signs of an inflammatory arthritis, the most priority is symptom relief, with pain being the cardinal sign of inflammation that patients most wish facilitate with. However, it has become more and more clear that for inflammatory arthropathies like RA merely treating the symptoms with non- Steroidal anti- inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or analgesics in adequate, because features of the disease that lead to damage to the joints, and then to disability will carry on uncheck.  In addition to symptoms –relieving drugs, patients also need disease-modifying pain drugs that have been demonstrated to slow down or stop the damaging aspects of disease There are two aims in the pharmacological treatment; firstly to reduce inflammation or modulate the auto immune response and secondly to modulate the pain response. Medications is thought-about in 5 classes: simple analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), Disease modifying anti-rheumatic-drugs (DMARD’S), Steroids, Biologics and other relevant Adjuvant analgesics (ex. antiepileptic and antidepressants used for pain relief).

 

  • Track 9-1Breakthrough Dosing
  • Track 9-2Routine Oral Dosing-Extended-Release and Long-Half-life Opioid Preparations
  • Track 9-3Pharmacologic Tolerance
  • Track 9-4Ongoing Assessment in Pain Management
  • Track 9-5Pain Physicians and Experts
  • Track 9-6Pain Management Products and Materials
  • Track 9-7Pain Pathophysiology. Acute vs. Chronic Pain
  • Track 9-8Pharmacologic Approaches to Pain Management: General Guidelines and Considerations
  • Track 9-9Various Pain medicines: Mechanism of Action
  • Track 9-10Adverse Effects of Pain Medications
  • Track 9-11In-vitro and In-vivo Studies
  • Track 9-12Routine Oral Dosing—Immediate-Release Preparations

Non-pharmacological approaches may contribute to effective analgesia and are often well accepted by patients. Some simple measures which are sometimes recommended (eg, hot or cold packs) have not been well studied. Complementary therapies for pain are often sought out by patients, and require evaluation for their potential role in the palliative care setting. The role of non-pharmacological approaches to pain management is evolving, and some non-pharmacological and complementary therapies have an increasingly important contribution to make to holistic patient care alongside analgesics. There is evidence to support the use of patient education, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), relaxation, and music. Importantly, however, some approaches have not been shown to be of benefit, including TENS, reflexology and acupuncture. For this reason, research on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management is very important, so that patients are provided with information that ensures them the most effective options for treating their pain. It is essential that palliative care patients with anything more than mild pain who are using complementary therapies should also be treated with appropriate analgesics and adjuvants, using an evidence-based approach.

 

  • Track 10-1Patient Education
  • Track 10-2Complementary Therapies
  • Track 10-3Acupuncture
  • Track 10-4Music therapy
  • Track 10-5Hypnosis
  • Track 10-6Massage Therapy
  • Track 10-7Reflexology
  • Track 10-8Mind-Body Therapies
  • Track 10-9Biofield Therapies
  • Track 10-10Art Therapy

To a certain extent, medical practitioners have always been specialized. Specialization was common among Roman physicians. The particular system of modern medical specialties evolved gradually during the 19th century. Informal social recognition of medical specialization evolved before the formal legal system. The particular subdivision of the practice of medicine into various specialties varies from country to country, and is somewhat arbitrary. Currently, there is no single field of medicine or health care that represents the preferred approach to pain management. Indeed, the premise of pain management is that a highly multidisciplinary approach is essential. Pain management specialists are most commonly found in the following disciplines: Physiatry (also called Physical medicine and rehabilitation), Anesthesiology, Interventional radiology, Physical therapy. Specialists in psychology, psychiatry, behavioral science, and other areas may also play an important role in a comprehensive pain management program. Selection of the most appropriate type of health professional - or team of health professionals - largely depends on the patient's symptoms and the length of time the symptoms have been present.

 

  • Track 11-1Chiropractors
  • Track 11-2Physiatrists or Rehabilitation Physicians
  • Track 11-3Rheumatologists
  • Track 11-4Orthopedic Surgeons
  • Track 11-5Physical Therapists
  • Track 11-6Acupuncturists
  • Track 11-7Pain Medicine Specialists
  • Track 11-8Osteopathic Doctors
  • Track 11-9Pediatric Pain Management

Orofaical pain is a general term covering any pain which is felt in the mouth, jaws and the face. Orofacial pain is a common symptom, and there are many causes. Orofacial pain has been defined as "pain localized to the region above the neck, in front of the ears and below the orbitomeatal line, as well as pain within the oral cavity, pain of dental origin and temporomandibular disorders".  It is estimated that over 95% of cases of orofacial pain result from dental causes (i.e. Toothache caused by pulpitis or a dental abscess). However, some orofacial pain conditions may involve areas outside this region, e.g. temporal pain in TMD. Toothache, or odontalgia, is any pain perceived in the teeth or their supporting structures (i.e. the periodontium). Toothache is therefore a type of orofacial pain. Craniofacial pain is an overlapping topic which includes pain perceived in the head, face, and related structures, sometimes including neck pain. All other causes of orofacial pain are rare in comparison, although the full differential diagnosis is extensive.

 

  • Track 12-1Burning Mouth Syndrome
  • Track 12-2Oral Cancer Pain
  • Track 12-3Oral Ulceration
  • Track 12-4Various surgical procedures
  • Track 12-5Orofacial Pain Treatment
  • Track 12-6Dental Pain Management
  • Track 12-7Medicine for Dental Pain
  • Track 12-8TMJ Pain and Treatment

Perianesthesia Nursing could be a nursing specialty practice area involved with providing medical care to patients undergoing or convalescent from anesthesia. Perianesthesia nursing encompasses many subspecialty observe space and represents a various range of practice environment and skill sets. Pain management nurses are typically thought-about to be perianesthesia nurses, given the cooperative nature of their work with anesthetists and also the fact that a large proportion of acute pain issues are surgery related. However, distinct pain management certifications exist through the American Society for Pain Management Nurses. The nurse’s primary commitment is to the health, welfare, comfort and safety of the patient. Self-awareness, knowledge of pain and pain assessment, and knowledge of the standard of care for pain management enhances the nurse’s ability to advocate for and assure effective pain management for each patient. When advocating for the patient, it is crucial that the nurse utilize and reference current evidence-based pain management standards and guidelines. The Role of nurse is responsible and accountable to ensure that a patient receives appropriate evidence-based nursing assessment and intervention which effectively treats the patient’s pain and meets the recognized standard of care.

 

  • Track 13-1Evidence Based Practice
  • Track 13-2Alternative Pain Management
  • Track 13-3Preoperative assessment
  • Track 13-4Post Anesthesia Care Unit
  • Track 13-5Ambulatory Care
  • Track 13-6Post Traumatic Pain Management
  • Track 13-7Advanced Pain Management